© 2017 Trøndelag Reiseliv AS

A MILLENNIUM OF TOURISM

 What is it about Trøndelag’s history that has led to people
making pilgrimages here from all over Europe for
hundreds of years – on foot?
 

Foto: David Tett

Most people know that due to St. Olav, Christians have travelled on pilgrimages to the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim from the 11th century up to the present day. A lesser known fact is that the customs and traditions of Trøndelag formed the foundations of the current Scandinavian democracy, which is internationally renowned as an extremely well-functioning form of society. Let’s take it step by step from the beginning.

The wanderlust of the Vikings, Berserkers on wild rampages and bloody feuds are reasonably well-known both in Norway and abroad. Accounts of Norwegian history are characterized by spectacular events, raids and conquests in Europe, crusading explorers and the mythical demolition of London Bridge. However, behind the brutal facade were peaceful people who
built the country with words rather than weapons. A fact that has received little attention in modern times is that Norway is the world’s oldest continuously functioning democracy with a democratic heritage dating back more than 1,000 years.

In the 3rd century AD, the Norwegian society transformed from a tribal society into a chieftain society – an elite warrior took political power based on loyalty from allied noblemen and farmers. The society was based on a system of laws and rules, whereby the laws were quoted from memory in the bygdeting (local assembly). People met on the tingplass (assembly site)
to make important decisions and resolve disputes. Traces of these sites are dated back to the 1st century AD. While the Migration Period in Europe (400-800 AD) was characterized by chaos and bloody expulsions, Scandinavia was characterized by relative harmony  that was unique in a European context.

 

Few Europeans travelled northwards, presumably because Norway and Sweden were relatively inaccessible and, even in the 4th and 5th centuries AD, Scandinavians had a reputation as skilled warriors. Consequently, what we know today as the “Scandinavian Model” developed in peace – a society based on laws, rules and customs, where peace was perceived as “sound economics”.

 

While Trøndelag was characterized by relative peace, compared with places on the continent and the British Isles, different areas were controlled by powerful and sometimes brutal chieftains. To deter enemies, these chieftains were surrounded by warriors but such
men did not come cheaply. Long before the Viking Age, from around 400 A.D., these chieftains travelled south on raids to loot and plunder valuables to pay their forces and thereby retain loyalty. Many warriors pledged allegiance to chieftains because they were renowned for sailing southwards and returning with valuable cargo.

 

Several of these chieftains also took on roles as commanders under Roman emperors, returning with gold as well as experience in the tactics and strategy of battle. There were many stories of fearless and bloodthirsty barbarians from the north long before the Viking Age, which were reinforced when emigration accelerated. As most of the Viking battles took place away from home, society in Norway generally progressed peacefully.

 

Many settled in Europe for longer periods, before eventually returning home with foreign customs and accounts of foreign people such as the Celts, Goths and Saxons. Culturally, the Trønders did not live in isolation before the Viking Age, as is evidenced by the iron industry in Levanger and Gauldalen. As early as 200 A.D., around 40 tonnes of iron of unrivalled
quality was produced annually for the Roman Empire, amongst others.

 

In line with the growing prosperity, the ting (derived from the Norse word for assembly) system was further developed and larger regional assemblies became more important. Here in Trøndelag, based on Trændalog (Trønder law), all the counties surrounding the Trondheimsfjord were covered by the Frostating. The system of democracy practiced in Norway today – based on fylkesting (county councils) and ultimately the Storting (parliament) – is a direct descendant of these ancient assemblies. Consequently, Norwegians have the world’s oldest democratic tradition.

Foto: Marius Rua

In the Viking Age, the areas ruled by these chieftains and petty kings became larger. There were conflicts with Danish as well as Swedish clans, leading to gradual nation building through larger kingdoms. This nation building was partly a response to similar larger foreign
powers: Threats from outside, combined with new opportunities for trade, led to Norwegians needing larger units that were united. Meanwhile, this era was characterized by constantly shifting alliances.

 

The list of Norwegian monarchs, and the pretty much stable unification of Norway into one kingdom, is an intricate story of clans and alliances, which is described in detail elsewhere. During the Viking Age, Norway was not one kingdom as it is today, but rather a system involving varying cooperation between the Crown and local kings and earls. The most
important for Trøndelag was the position of the Earls of Lade, who ruled Northern Norway, Trøndelag and Western Norway.

 

Olav II Haraldsson (often referred to as Olav the Stout) later became perhaps the most important king of Norway. After defeating the Earls of Lade and the King of Denmark, King Olav II became the first king since Harald Fairhair to rule over a unified Norway. As a Christian, King Olav cooperated with the church politically as well as economically to create a permanent unified nation. Meanwhile, many disliked Olav’s sometimes brutal Christianization of the country, and the King of Denmark, Canute the Great, bought
himself an alliance to overthrow Olav.

 

Olav fled the country to Gardarike (now part of Russia) in 1028, and Canute the Great installed the Earls of Lade to rule the country on his behalf. Two years later, Olav returned to Norway with his men to realize his vision: To unify Norway into a Christian kingdom. Olav
sought to gain the support of farmers in Trøndelag to defeat the Earls of Lade. When he reached Stiklestad, Olav was attacked and killed by his opponents. Legend has it that several miracles occurred after his death (which you can read about on pages 30-31). These miracles
and Olav’s sainthood mark the most important and decisive stages in the Christianization of Norway; Christianity had secured its ultimate victory among the people, and Olav’s vision was fulfilled.

Foto: Eskil Roll

THE PILGRIM PATHS - WALKING WITH MEANING AND PURPOSE

Ever since the death of King Olav II, the Nidaros Cathedral built over his burial site has been Northern Europe’s most important pilgrimage site. To this day, people travel from Germany, Spain and Italy to walk on foot – the whole way or part of the pilgrim route – to the national sanctuary in Trondheim.

 

The longest pilgrim route in Norway is the Gudbrandsdalen Path, which in medieval times was the main route to Nidaros (now Trondheim). Other important routes include the St. Olav Path from the Swedish coast to Trondheim, the Østerdalen Path and the North Path from Gløshaug Church via Stiklestad. A common theme of these and other routes is that they offer locally marked paths through the Norwegian cultural landscape, mountains, forests and many historical sites.

 

For most people, the walk along the pilgrim route offers time for reflection – a spiritual experience combined with the tranquility of nature. Many pilgrims say that having plenty of time to think is an important motivation for walking the trail. The pilgrimage offers an opportunity to leave one’s routines and stress behind and experience an inner peace and sense of calmness.

 

While walking these routes, the pilgrims will discover a range of unique lodgings, cultural experiences and an insight into Norwegian history

 

Pilgrimages are personal and every pilgrim will have their own unique experience. But all of them will have an experience they will remember for the rest of their life – and many return to walk other paths.  

Foto: David Tett

RECEIVE THE OLAV LETTER

All pilgrims can get a pilgrim passport and collect stamps from churches and pilgrim lodgings along the route. Everyone who walks the final 100 km into Trondheim qualifies for the pilgrim’s certificate, also known as the ‘Olav letter’.

 

PLAN YOUR PILGRIMAGE

On stolavways.com, you will find further information about the pilgrim paths in Norway. This website includes a practical trip planner, which make it easy to create your own itinerary. You will also find recommended walks, itineraries, a packing list and printable maps.

Read more at www.stolavways.com

Foto: Sigrid Lindstad

WARRIOR, KING AND SAINT

Olav Haraldsson lost the Battle of Stiklestad, but won the battle for the Norwegian soul.

Olav II Haraldsson is best known as a saint and the Viking King of Norway. During his life, he was primarily a warrior and adventurer who sought battle, wealth and alliances in Northern Europe.

Olav’s nickname Olav the Stout indicates that he was a large, heavily built man. Ancient poems and chronicles tell us that Olav participated in the attack on and siege of London in 1009. He was also involved in besieging and plundering Canterbury, ravaging in France and fighting with enemies in Sweden and Denmark. In the spring of 1014, Olav allied himself with King Ethelred II, and Olav and his men joined Ethelred’s army to 
reconquer England from the Danes.

 

The Danish King Canute fled to Denmark, but returned to England in June 1015. Olav then 
changed sides and supported Canute’s invasion. Olav stayed with Canute until they had conquered Wessex. However, a power struggle evolved with the Danish King Canute, whose aim was to rule over Norway. Olav Haraldsson was ultimately killed at Stiklestad, which has since been referred to as the Battle of Stiklestad.

 

A farmer at Stiklestad took care of Olav’s corpse. It was later taken to Nidaros (Trondheim) and buried. Colloquially and legend has it that several miracles happened, including that Olav’s hair and nails continued to grow after his death and that the blind recovered their sight after contact with body of the dead king. Reports of the miracles surrounding Olav
took hold in Europe, and he was canonized in 1031. The Nidaros Cathedral, which was later built over his grave, has been Northern Europe’s most important pilgrimage site for almost 1,000 years.

 

The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav) was written in memory of the battle and the Saint King. The play is a dramatic presentation of the events leading up to the death of the king. The play, which premiered in 1954, is performed at Stiklestad every summer.

HISTORICAL EXPERIENCES AND ACTIVITIES EVERY DAY THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER!

 23 JUNE - 12 AUGUST 2018

STIKLASTADIR

On a visit to the mediaeval farm of Stiklastadir, you can
immerse yourself in the Viking Age and the Middle Ages.
Learn about the period before the battle and the new society that emerged. The children can act as archaeologists and find traces of the past, or dress up as Vikings and fight with swords and shields in a “play battle”. You can also
experience archery, axe throwing, medieval crafts, historical
food and more.


Guided tours and storytelling sessions are also offered daily
at Stiklastadir.

THE FAMILY SILVER

The folk museum is brought to life in the summer with
The Family Silver (Arvesølvet). Three enclosed areas will be
brought to life, replicating the years 1898, 1942 and 1959.
Exciting stories will be told of everyday life with fun, laughter
and sincerity. The folk museum also features a historic café
and various family activities.

The Saint Olav Festival (Olsokdagene) at Stiklestad

23 – 29 July 2018 

A full week of experiences and activities for the whole family.
Welcome to evocative concerts, interesting lectures, the
Stiklastadir Market and The Saint Olav Drama (on 25, 27, 28 and 29 July at 19.00).

For further info, festival programme and tickets, please visit:

www.stiklestad.no

ARCHITECTURE FOR ETERNITY

 

Right in the heart of historic Trondheim, surrounded by a beautiful cemetery and park winding along the river, is the Nidaros Cathedral.

The cathedral is built over the tomb of St. Olav, the Viking King, who became the patron saint of Norway. Work on the cathedral was started in 1070 by King Olav III and was completed around 1300. The cathedral is under continuous restoration to preserve the virtually infinite details of the architecture.

 

The mythology and culture surrounding St. Olav led to the cathedral quickly becoming the most important sanctuary of the Catholic Church in Northern Europe. Pilgrims from across Europe have walked to Nidaros – the old name of Trondheim – for centuries and to this day it’s one of Europe’s main historical pilgrim destinations. The Nidaros Cathedral is Norway’s national sanctuary and the site of coronations and royal blessings.

 

Architecturally, the Nidaros Cathedral Nidaros is the world’s northernmost Gothic cathedral. Built of greenish and grey soapstone, the foundations were laid by Archbishop Eystein Erlandsson who was inspired by the Canterbury Cathedral in England. The most striking
feature of Norway’s mighty cathedral is the West Front, featuring the great Rose Window depicting the Day of Judgement, and the 76 statues and reliefs on the western wall.

 

Restoration and reconstruction of the cathedral has taken place continuously for more than 130 years and is an ongoing project. The major restoration project currently underway is the royal entranceway on the southern side of the cathedral. When you visit the cathedral, you can also delve into the history and details of the architecture and the continuous work of the buildings and artistic decorations.

 

As well as being used for religious events for the city’s churchgoers, the Nidaros Cathedral hosts concerts and other cultural activities. Curious visitors can spend hours exploring the decorations and details, large and small, inside as well as outside. The highlight for many is climbing the 172 steps of the cathedral tower and enjoying the spectacular views of Trondheim.

 

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

 

Right beside the Nidaros Cathedral is the Archbishop’s Palace. Together the buildings play a central role in Norway’s history. Ever since the late 12th century, the Archbishop’s Palace has been a meeting place for powerful men and a venue for important meetings and grand parties.
From the mid of the 12th century until the Reformation in 1537, the Archbishop’s Palace was the residence of the Archbishop of Nidaros. No less than 27 archbishops have lived here. After the Reformation, ownership passed to the King and Danish feudal overlords took over the palace and ruled it on behalf of the King in Copenhagen. The building is now home to the Archbishop’s Palace Museum, the Armory and Resistance Museum and the Crown Regalia featuring the Norwegian crown jewels.

Foto: Henning Grøtt

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL

The Nidaros Cathedral is open to the public every day of the year.
During the summer seasons, guided tours are offered daily in
Norwegian, English, German and French. In summer, it’s also possible
to climb the tower and enjoy a wonderful view of the city.

Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40

 

THE CROWN REGALIA

The King’s crown and other items that make up the Regalia of 
Norway are displayed in the west wing of the Archbishop’s Palace.

Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40

Closed on Mondays in the off-season

 

ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE MUSEUM

The Archbishop’s Palace Museum houses the most spectacular finds from the archaeological excavations in the 1980s.

Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40

Closed on Mondays in the off-season.

www.nidarosdomen.no

Foto: Lasse Berre

HISTORICAL TRØNDELAG

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL

The world’s northernmost Gothic cathedral.

www.nidarosdomen.no

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

The Crown Regalia, archaeological exhibition.

www.nidarosdomen.no

KRISTIANSTEN FORTRESS

Fort towering over downtown Trondheim..

www.forsvarsbygg.no

MUNKHOLMEN

Trondheim’s Viking Age execution site is
now a popular excursion spot.

www.munkholmen.no

RINGVE MUSIC MUSEUM

Norway’s national museum for music and instruments.

www.ringve.no

THE ARMORY & RESISTANCE MUSEUM

The Armed Forces’ museum in Trondheim.

www.rustkammeret.no

SVERRESBORG TRØNDELAG FOLKEMUSEUM

One of Norway’s largest open air museums.

www.sverresborg.no

TRONDHEIM MARITIME MUSEUM

Exhibition on maritime history.www.trondheimsjofart.no

EGGE MUSEUM

Open air museum with animals.

www.eggemuseum.no

STIKLESTAD NATIONAL CULTURE CENTRE

Battleground where King Olav II fell and museum. 

www.stiklestad.no

THE FALSTAD CENTRE

National centre for human rights.www.falstadsenteret.no

SAEMIEN SIJTE

Conveys Southern Sami culture history.

www.saemiensijte.no

HEGRA FORTRESS

National memorial and vibrant fortress.

www.hegrafestning.no

MUNKEBY MONASTERY RUINS

Ruins of 12th century monastery.

www.fortidsminneforeningen.no

TAUTRA MONASTERY RUINS

Monastery ruins from 1207 side by side idyllic Klostergården.

www.fortidsminneforeningen.no

TINGHAUGEN

Norway’s oldest court.

www.visitfrosta.no

STEINVIKHOLM CASTLE

Island fortress dating from the 14th century.

www.fortidsminneforeningen.no

COASTAL MUSEUM NORVEG AND SØR-GJÆSLINGAN

Coastal heritage centre, exhibitions, historic walks, films and storytelling theatre.

www.kystmuseetnorveg.no

NORWEGIAN SAWMILL MUSEUM

A national technical industrial heritage site.

www.sagbruksmuseet.no

OPPDAL MUSEUM

The history of Oppdal from late 16th century to 1950.

www.oppdalsmuseet.no

VIKING BURIAL FIELD AT VANG

Norway’s largest Viking Age burial field.

www.oppdalsmuseet.no

RØROS MUSEUM

Experience historical Røros with a visit to Olav’s Mine and The Copper Works

www.rorosmuseet.no

MELDAL DISTRICT MUSEUM

Open air museum with around 20 preserved buildings.

www.meldal.kommune.no

SELBU FOLK MUSEUM

Experience Selbu’s rich cultural heritage of handicrafts.

www.visitselbu.no

ORKLA MUSEUM OF INDUSTRY

Experiences for the whole family based on the
Thamshavn line and the Gammelgruva mine.

www.oi.no

BJUGN BYGDATUN MØLNARGÅRDEN

Open air museum with 18 buildings and 39 boats.

www.molnargaarden.no

COASTAL MUSEUM OF SØR TRØNDELAG

Exhibitions on coastal culture and aquaculture.www.kystmuseet.no

KYSTENS ARV

Coastal heritage museum with boat building yard and one of the country’s largest collections of traditional clinker-built boats.

www.kystensarv.no

AUSTRÅTT MANOR

Renaissance manor dating from 1656.

www.nkim.no/austratt

AUSTRÅTT FORT

German World War II coastal artillery site.

www.nasjonalefestningsverk.no/austraatt

TRONDHEIM - THE CITY IN THE MIDDLE

 

 

When you arrive in Trondheim, the city’s 1,000-year history is obvious. The natural
harbours of the Nidelva river formed the basis of what was once the country’s most
powerful city. With the mighty Nidaros Cathedral on the riverbank, Trondheim has
held the position as Northern Europe’s most important church town ever since the
death of King Olav II in 1030. The Nidaros Cathedral, which is one of Norway's most
important cultural buildings, towers over the city’s other buildings and is visible
from virtually everywhere in the city.

You will find contrasts in the narrow alleys and small house settlements that are reminiscent of poor conditions, just a stone’s throw away from wide Frenchlike avenues and impressive buildings of the city’s former notables.

 

The intimate city centre of pedestrian streets, cobblestones and wooden buildings help make Trondheim an inclusive city, while the its cultural and commercial offerings compare favourably with larger European cities.

 

The shopping and cultural scene is surrounded by city parks, and adjacent to the city is a large outdoor recreation reserve with endless opportunities for hiking and cross-country skiing. Whether your heart desires culture, food, biking or shopping, Trondheim has
something to suit virtually everyone.

Trondheim is a mecca for foodies with an annual food festival, the regular Farmers’ Market, small-scale breweries and coffee roasters, and several restaurants that rank among the best in Scandinavia. Local cuisine – traditional as well as contemporary – can be found at
most venues where people meet, while at the recently established Trondheim Food Hall (Mathallen) you can enjoy the full taste of Trøndelag gathered under one roof.

Exciting and diverse shopping is on offer in the central city – or “Midtbyen” as it’s known - with clothing and interior from national, international and local brands and designers, various pop-up concepts and niche stores such as Seams, Bakklandet Blomster and the
design collective Sukker.

 

With a population of over 190,000, Trondheim ranks as Norway’s third largest city. This provides the basis for a rich cultural scene, including the flagship St. Olav Festival, the country’s largest religious and cultural festival. Specific festivals are devoted to most musical styles, including jazz, blues, chamber music, electronic music and world music. The main sites in Trondheim include the Nidaros Cathedral, the Archbishop’s Palace, Ringve Music Museum and Rockheim – the national museum of popular music. In addition, there is a unique creative power in the city in the form of the strong business sector, exciting start-up milieu, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) with more than 36,000
students, a world-leading research environment at SINTEF and Nobel Prize winners May-Britt and Edvard Moser, who represent the spearhead of the city’s
strong specialist environment.

Trondheim - a small city with big experiences!

www.visittrondheim.no

EVENTS IN TRØNDELAG

 

The residents of Trøndelag love to gather! Regardless of the season you visit, there is bound to be an outdoor theatrical performance, festival or market taking place somewhere in the region.

The most popular events include the St. Olav Festival (Olavsfestdagene), the Trøndelag Food Festival and the Pstereo Festival in Trondheim, The Saint Olav Festival (Olsokdagene) at Stiklestad featuring The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav), the annual winter market Rørosmartnan and the Steinkjer Festival.

 

The St. Olav Festival in Trondheim is Norway’s largest church and cultural festival, each year presenting concerts by a mix of regional, national and international stars along with lectures, meetings and a historical market. This coincides with the Trøndelag Food Festival in and
around the main square, featuring a wide range of food stalls, culinary courses and restaurants. You will find traditional music festivals in virtually every municipality throughout the region, while the locals of Fosen, Hitra and Frøya hold fishing festivals
renowned for their great atmosphere.

 

During the annual Saint Olav Festival at Stiklestad, the area around the Stiklestad National Culture Centre is full of activities for the whole family in the daytime and The Saint Olav  drama in the evening, as well as wonderful concerts and exciting lectures. The Saint
Olav Drama takes place on the actual battlefield where Olav Haraldsson fell in 1030.

 

Other outdoor theatrical performances worth noting include “The Last Viking” (Den siste viking) in Stadsbygd, “Pe-Torsa” in Lierne and “Elden” in Røros, while the magical rock theatre “Rebella Hex” at the Namsskogan Family Park has become a tradition for our younger
visitors.

There is also a strong tradition of markets in Trøndelag, as reflected by the annual Rørosmartnan, Rennebumartnan and Christmas markets in Trondheim and
Røros, the regular Farmers’ Market and several other local markets. These are excellent places to look for local food, decorative arts and crafts, and increasingly more markets are focusing on local quality goods. 

WHAT'S ON?

18.-20. January  |

9.-4. February  |

20.–24. February  |

24. February  |

28. February -3. Mars  | 15.-18.Mars  | 15.-18.Mars  |

09.-13. May  |

26. May  |

31.mai-2. June  |

7.-10. June  |

22.-23. June  |

29. juni-30. June  |

29. juni-30. June  |

2.-3. July  |

4.-8. July  |

13.-14. July  |

13.-15. July  |

20.-21. July  |

25. July-4. August  |

25., 27.-29. July  |

26.-28. July  |

26.-29 July  |

28. July-04. August  | 2.-4. August  |
3.-5. August  |

10.-12. August  |

16.-18. August  |

16.-18. August  |

23.-26. August  |

30. Aug. - 02. Sept. |

01. September |

5.–7. October |

7.–11. November |

2. December |

6.-9. December |

8.-9. December |

Mid. December |

KAROLINERSPELET

FEMUNDLØPET SLED DOG RACE RØROSMARTNAN

SALTDALSHYTTA SKIENERN MARSIMARTNAN

SKREI (COD) FESTIVAL

WINTER CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL TRONDHEIM JAZZ FESTIVAL

TOUR DE FRØYA (CYCLING RACE)

VØMMØL FESTIVAL

INDERØYFEST

STEINKJER FESTIVAL

STOKKØYA FESTIVAL

SULA FESTIVAL

TRONDHEIM ROCKS

UTIHAVET FESTIVAL

TYDAL FESTIVAL

BESSAKER FISHING FESTIVAL

HOPSJØ FESTIVAL

ELDEN

SAINT OLAV DRAMA

HEIM FESTIVAL

RÅKVÅG ANNO 1930

ST. OLAV FESTIVAL

TRØNDELAG FOOD & BREWERY FESTIVAL

COASTAL CULTURE DAYS RENNEBUMARTNAN

NAMSOSMARTNAN

PSTEREO FESTIVAL

PE-TORSA PLAY

HELL BLUES FESTIVAL

DYNAFIT TROLLHEIMEN FJELLMARATON

FÅRIKÅL FESTIVAL

HILMAR FESTIVAL

ADVENT AT EGGE MUSEUM

RØROS CHRISTMAS MARKET

CHRISTMAS MARKET AT STIKLESTAD TRONDHEIM CHRISTMAS MARKET

|  Tydal

|  Røros

|  Røros

|  Oppdal

|  Levanger

|  Rørvik

|  Røros

|  Trondheim

|  Frøya

|  Verdal

|  Inderøy

|  Steinkjer

|  Stokkøya

|  Sula

|  Trondheim

|  Mausundvær |  Tydal

|  Bessaker

|  Hitra

|  Røros

|  Stiklestad, Verdal

|  Stadsbygd

|  Råkvåg, Rissa

|  Trondheim

|  Trondheim
|  Bjugn

|  Rennebu

|  Namsos

|  Trondheim

|  Lierne

|  Hell, Stjørdal

|  Oppdal

|  Oppdal

|  Steinkjer

|  Steinkjer

|  Røros

|  Stiklestad, Verdal

|  Trondheim

THE MILLENNIUM CITY OF TRONDHEIM

 

A journey in time in the Suhm building

Over the centuries, fires and rezoning in Trondheim have erased most traces of the medieval town, so archaeological finds of houses and streets provide an exceptional starting point for recreating the townscape of 7-8 centuries ago. Archaeologists have been undertaking excavations in Trondheim for more than a century. Houses and streets from the city’s 1,000-year history have been uncovered, and many ancient artefacts have been carefully excavated and interpreted.

 

Besides archaeological finds, written sources and pieces of information from buildings that have survived the ravages of time elsewhere have also proved useful. While the archaeologists are continually providing new material about Trondheim’s history, it’s worth noting that just 4-5 per cent of the urban area has been systematically surveyed. Consequently, we can expect many exciting developments in the years ahead. In some cases, the results of the archaeological excavations will lead to new conclusions and assessments about the city’s history!

The Medieval Trondheim exhibition enables you to stroll through the city’s history. Starting in the Viking era, you can go on a journey through more than 1,000 years! Follow the city’s development from the very beginning at Kaupangen by the mouth of the river Nidelven to the ‘’great’’ medieval town of Nidaros.


The exhibition presents items used in everyday life in medieval Nidaros, most of which date from the 13th and 14th centuries. Entire streets have been recreated, providing a unique glimpse into the everyday life in medieval Nidaros. 
Join us on a journey back in time!

RINGVE BOTANICAL GARDEN

NTNU’s blooming attraction in Lade
 

Beautiful plants, crops, historic garden culture and evolution. Ringve Botanical Garden contains all this and more.


The university’s botanical garden has a wonderful elevated location overlooking the city and fjord. The garden surrounds the historic Ringve manor house, and one of its many highlights is the Historic Park, which was originally planted in English landscape style in the 1860s as the manor house garden.

 

Colourful flowerbeds bloom in the springtime before the green leaves return on the majestic deciduous trees during the summer. 
Beautiful and scientific complement each other at a botanical garden. The Systematic Garden is designed so visitors can experience some of the oldest groups of plants on earth, such as ferns and cryptogams, and follow the evolutionary paths towards the flowering plants’ intricate adaptations to bees and the other insects which pollinate them. Equally fascinating is a stroll around the large pond at Ringve. Representing the Arctic Ocean, the path around it leads you through changing forests planted to correspond with their geographic distribution.
 
From April to October, you can stimulate your memories and senses while walking along the path in the Old Perennials, which features collections of colourful and fragrant traditional garden plants from Trøndelag. The refined Renaissance Garden is also well worth a visit.


You can combine your trip to the Ringve Botanical Garden with a visit to the Ringve Music Museum in the historic Ringve manor house, and grab a bite to eat at Café Victoria.

 

Read more at: www.ntnu.no/vitenskapsmuseet

TRØNDELAG FOR CHILDREN

OASEN SVØMME OG MILJØSENTER

Northern Europe’s largest water park in a mountain, with water slides and a diving tower.

www.oasen-namsos.no

DOKTORTJØNNA FRILUFTSPARK

Perfect for summer family fun. Children can try paddling, log rafting, nature trails and more.

www.rorosmuseet.no/doktortjonna

EGGE MUSEUM

Open air museum with animals and exhibitions in a child-friendly area.

www.eggemuseum.no

NAMSSKOGAN FAMILIEPARK

One of Norway’s largest and best wildlife and activity parks.

www.familieparken.no

RYPETOPPEN ADVENTUREPARK

Climbing park, canoe and SUP rental, zip-lines.

www.rypetoppen.no

OPPLEV OPPDAL

Children’s rafting, wilderness camp and outdoor tournament.

www.opplevoppdal.no

STIKLESTADSOMMER

Exciting activities for young and old. Be a Viking for a day and learn what life was like in the Viking Age.

www.stiklestad.no

BARNAS NATURVERDEN

In the realm of the Jutul – north of the Dovre Mountains and east of Trollheimen – you will discover The Children’s Natural World

www.tt.no/barnas-naturverden

SVERRESBORG FOLKEMUSEUM

Be a knight for a day, meet the animals and go on a guided historic walk.

www.sverresborg.no

TRONDHJEMS SJØFARTSMUSEUM

Take the ship rat Sivert’s seamen’s test and check out exhibitions on the steamship and sailing ship eras.

www.trondheimsjofart.no

VITENSENTERET

Have fun with science and technology. An oasis for explorers of all ages and the place for aha experiences!

www.vitensenteret.com

NTNU VITENSKAPSMUSEET

Museum of natural and cultural history with exhibitions on science, archaeology and cultural history.

www.ntnu.no/vitenskapsmuseet

NIDAROSDOMEN OG ERKEBISPEGÅRDEN

Go exploring at the Nidaros Cathedral and see Trondheim from the top of the tower (min. age 8) then see the King’s Crown at the Crown Regalia!. 

www.nidarosdomen.no

PIRBADET

Norway’s largest indoor water park with proximity to and view of the fjord, weather and wind. 

www.pirbadet.no

BARNAS RINGVE

Instrument workshop, courses and guided tours for children in wonderful surroundings at the Ringve Music Museum.

www.ringve.no

ROCKHEIM

An exciting place for the whole family with musical activities for young and old.

www.rockheim.no

GREAT SHOPPING IN TRONDHEIM

In our compact city center you just take a short walk between our many shops. Choose between Scandinavian design, luxury, specialized and sport shops, local food and shopping senters as well as numerous cafés and restaurants.

Opening hours: 10.00 - 18.00 daily except Sundays

EXPERIENCE THE PAST
LIVE IN THE PRESENT
DREAM OF THE FUTURE

Ringve musikkmuseum

www.ringve.no

The Museums of Sør-Trøndelag create unique cultural experiences all year round.

Norsk Døvemuseum

www.norsk-dovemuseum.no

Rockheim

The national museum of popular music

www.rockheim.no

Orkla Industrimuseum

www.oi.no

Trondheim kunstmuseum

www.trondheimkunstmuseum.no

Museet Kystens Arv

www.kystensarv.no

Rørosmuseet

www.rorosmuseet.no

Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum

www.nkim.no

Trondhjems Sjøfartsmuseum

Our history at sea 

www.trondheimsjofart.no

Sverresborg Trøndelag Folkemuseum

www.sverresborg.no

Kystmuseet i Sør-Trøndelag

We tell the story

www.kystmuseet.no

ON TRACK TO SPECIAL TIME

Some people want to experience the sunset over the Trondheimsfjord and the bountiful cultural landscape of the interior. Others seek deep forests and river valleys. Or perhaps you want to travel slowly through Trondheim? Regardless of where you are going, a train journey offers you time to relax and enjoy.

Apart from being disconnected from the tasks and rhythm of everyday life, what does having a “holiday” entail? For many, it’s about being free; free to rediscover the time and rhythm you want – right here, right now. 

 

Consequently, for many people, their trip to Trøndelag starts and finishes on the train. With train services from Røros and Oppdal via Trondheim to Steinkjer and Storlien, the Trøndelag and Røros lines take you through much of Trøndelag, with a wealth of interesting places to stop at along the way. During the journey, you can look out the window and enjoy the constantly changing panorama, light and moods.

 

If you have seen enough and want to digest your experiences, you have plenty of time to read a good book or the newspaper, listen to your favourite music, play a game, chat with your travel companion or continue an unfinished knitting project ... The list is endless and it’s your time. 

 

For many, travelling by train is the most convenient option – if you can’t or don’t want to drive – and the environmental footprint is minimal. Trains allow you to travel effortlessly from village to city centre and fjord to mountain – and back again or continue to your next destination. 

 

Allow time. Take the train!

Read more at www.nsb.no

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